Archive for May, 2014

Getting your band noticed can seem like a daunting if not impossible task. Promoting your art and getting publicity are things you know you should be doing but it can be hard to know where to start. Fortunately, we’ve broken it down for you into four distinct sections: Image, Radio, Publicists and the One Sheet. So let’s dive in!


Part I: Image

If you want to have an impact on your audience you must take the time to think about your image and accompanying artwork. You will surely find examples where image didn’t matter in someone’s career but, generally speaking, image is very important. Your music and image are often intertwined and send a message about who you are. Regardless of the genre of your music, your image should be an honest and accurate reflection of who you are. Your music should suit your image and not leave people confused and guessing what kind of music you perform. Here’s an extreme example to help you get the point: if you’re in a modern rock band, it isn’t a good idea for the band to be photographed wearing cowboy hats and sitting on hay bales…and yes, we have seen this! If you are not comfortable looking a certain way, don’t do it. When it comes time to hire a photographer you will probably also need to hire a wardrobe stylist who will make you look your best and help you look like a cohesive unit if you are a band. Similarly, your artwork can have an impact on shaping your career. Here are some classic album cover images that will instantly appear in your head: “Nevermind” by Nirvana, “Abbey Road” by The Beatles, “London Calling” by The Clash. People often do judge an album by its cover. Your cover can have a lasting impact, as should your music.

Part II: Radio

Is the song great? Is it as good or better than anything being played right now? Be honest with yourself. You may think some artist’s suck but if they’re getting widespread radio play, then they’re doing something right. It doesn’t mean it is better than yours but it means it fits those specific radio station’s formats.

Do you have a story to tell? Are you selling out shows? Is your song on a tv commercial or movie? Is there any press? Are people in your area familiar with you? Are people who don’t know you calling the local radio station on their own asking them to play your music? Do radio stations even know you exist? How are your YouTube views? Are your social numbers big? Are people engaging with you online? Are bloggers talking about you? Are other artists talking about you? Is your song available for purchase on the dsp’s and is it selling? Are there labels and publishers involved with your project? If not, why not?

These are the types of questions that radio programmers will ask before even considering playing your music. Be sure to include them in your pitch.

You must be prepared. Radio play is only one component of a bigger, balanced plan. Depending on your style of music, you may be the type of Artist that never gets (or wants) widespread commercial airplay. If that’s the case, you will still want to look at local station’s indie hours (if they have one), non-commercial radio, campus radio, specialty shows, internet radio, and more. They are all examples of ways to eventually get on radio playlists but ALL the above questions still stand.

Part III: Publicists

Are you ready for a Publicist? Well, a Publicist can be an important part of your team or a colossal waste of your money, this depends on you. Generally speaking, you need to have a good reason to hire a Publicist. It typically circles around a new release. If you have new music coming get your tools together: artwork, bio, photos, videos, and more. Think about a lead time of at least three months for your Publicist to set up your campaign and attempt to confirm long-lead press. Even all of this is not enough to garner much attention; you need a story. If you’ve played a bunch of shows and have built up a decent following you need to have your Publicist talk about it. Have you played with other more well know bands? If so, you need to drop their names. Do your lyrics come from a dark place due to something that happened in your life? If so, you may need to tell the story. Think of what people will find interesting about you and your artistry. With a Publicist, you typically pay for a specific time period and there are no guarantees that you will get any press. Shop around. Speak to as many Publicists as you can. See if there’s a natural fit. Do they specialize in your type of music? Which other artists do they represent? Have they had good placements for their clients? Talk to those artists if you can. You will want personal service and the best advocate for your brand. Be ready, choose wisely, and don’t waste your money.

Part IV: The One Sheet

What do you need to accompany your music? First of all, we at Coalition Music feel there’s no need to print anything or manufacture something elaborate. Save your money and use it for something else. We usually like to see a PDF one-sheet (or sometimes called a hype sheet) that contains a short bio, photo, links to videos, relevant press (we don’t care who you’ve shared the stage with at a multi act festival), list of past/future tour dates, links to your socials, links to music, etc. Basically, we want to be able to get to know you without sifting and searching for and through tons of material. Tell us what’s really going on with your project but don’t hype us with bullshit. Do you have a story to tell? A one-sheet should literally be one sheet.

 


Coalition Music, a full service global music management, record company and artist incubator, has been helping musicians facilitate their own success for over 23 years, cultivating an internationally renowned artist roster that includes Our Lady Peace, Simple Plan, USS and Finger Eleven. Besides representing an exceptional breadth of successful Canadian talent, running a record label and overseeing a world-class recording studio and rehearsal space, Coalition Music also runs an incubator/education facility which offers a variety of professional development and education programs that incorporate unique networking, collaborating and mentorship opportunities.  such as Artist Entrepreneur, the Coalition Music Tour and Tech Academy, and “The Music Business”, a registered high school credit course which is run by Coalition Music’s charitable arm, TEMPO (Through Education Music Provides Opportunity). The high school course complements traditional high school music education with business and entrepreneurial skills, and is offered at Wexford Collegiate School for the Arts, and through the Toronto Catholic School Board’s Continuing Education Department, in both night and summer school programming. The course is also offered at Wasse Abin High School of the Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve on Manitoulin Island, and will be expanded into Nbisiing Secondary School on the Nipissing First Nation Reserve in 2014. Coalition Music’s cross-functional business and facility have been recognized throughout the music industry and beyond, and were recently featured as a case study for music education development in Music Canada’s recent publication on the state of the Canadian music industry, The Next Big Bang.

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If you aren’t taking steps to protect and enhance your vocal capability there’s a good chance that these tips can ensure you perform at the highest level you’re capable of. Your first wise career move could’ve been to start reading this article!

What you drink is important – Water and warm tea

What you drink impacts heavily on the state and readiness of your voice. Water being one of the primary component building blocks of our bodies (around 60%) is necessary to staying hydrated and keeping your throat in healthy shape. Ideally if you’re male, you should be having about 3 litres of fluids a day or 2.2 if you are female. Cutting out fizzy drinks that are full of sugar is another great step you can take towards vocal health and durability, it should also be a relatively pain free and easy adjustment to make, especially considering the availability of water in comparison.

Lower your voice!

Any shouting or even talking at a volume that is uncomfortable or causing a strain on your vocal cords is likely to lead to hoarseness and fragility in the spoken voice. In your warm-ups that involve dynamics it’s important to acknowledge the sections that test your limits don’t last too long and cause a problem with the rest of your range and dictation. Staying in the range you find most useful allows you to warm up and become accustomed to that ability.


You are what you eat

Eat regularly and healthily, as stated above – stay hydrated as this can really affect vocal folds. However, avoiding food and drink containing caffeine or alcohol helps you retain optimum performance and health in general.

No smoking

Simply put, smoking is bad for your voice; it’s also bad in many other ways for your health. If you make a living from your voice or hope to, quitting smoking is one of the most encouraging steps you can take to ensure your livelihood is in good shape for the foreseeable future. If you are that rarity that requires tobacco to give a certain effect to your performances, then it is your responsibility to regulate how much you have and to bear in mind the risks involved.


Voice therapists and lessons

Professional advice can be invaluable, whether you’re trying to add something to your repertoire that clients will respect or your technique has some flaws that need buffing out. Although you should do your research and really consider what you’re paying for, a good teacher could prove invaluable in gaining ground on the competition and improving yourself.

Medication and throat sweets

If you’re using any medication, especially if it’s long term then knowing if there are any side effects that can harm or alter your voice. Any implications from medication should always be considered and weighed against your ability to perform; obviously if you need them then there’s no question that you’ll need to strike a balance in your health and vocals.

Common sense

Aside from these points, use your brain! Lasting damage is not hard to inflict, especially when being careless and not thinking about how your actions will impact your vocal cords and general health. Whether your career is in singing, voice over recording and translation or even if your voice just needs extra attention, following as many of these tips as possible will set you well on your way.

internship

In and around Ontario, the war on internships rages on. It’s been a hot topic in the press as of late since 2 Canadian magazines (Toronto Life and The Walrus) dismissed their interns after the provincial government questioned the ethics behind unpaid youth employment. This isn’t the first time internship drama has made an impact in the media – there was the Fox ‘Black Swan’ lawsuit that created quite a swell of excitement in September 2013 and it’s got me thinking.

As an intern you have an opportunity to prove to a company why you deserve to be hired over anyone else. In J.J. McCullough’s article for the National Post titled ‘Why Internships Should be Illegal‘, he likens unpaid internships to “something [that] can be very good for business yet still ugly and immoral.” He even goes as far as to educate young internship victims (eyeroll) on “9 tips for ending your internship on a positive note”. As a business owner who employs unpaid interns, I regularly come into contact with many people who agree with McCullough’s point of view on a practice that is a personal career choice many young professionals make. A wise career choice, if you ask me.

Allow me to add a personal spin. Internships are something I feel very passionately about – at the age of 15, the indie record label Wind-Up Records Canada gave me my first internship opportunity. I remember driving from Barrie to Toronto to be interviewed in their office and being totally amazed. It was in that moment I knew I was exactly where I needed to be and that this opportunity was a great chance to prove myself and start my long career in music. Three months later I was hired on a contract basis to coordinate Lifestyle Marketing, and from there I continued to weave my way into the fabric of the company. I started my own company three years later (at the age of 18), and Wax Records (ex-Wind-Up) has been one of my longest standing clients. I am not saying there aren’t bad internships out there, and with them bad experiences, but as a young professional it is your responsibility to decide if you are getting what you need out of an internship and leave if it is not something you enjoy doing. At some point as a young adult you are are going to have to learn how to navigate a good or bad opportunity! It will get easier the more of both kinds you come face-to-face with.

Later on, when I sat down to build the strategies I would run my own company with, I knew interns would be a crucial part of the team. At all times we have 4 to 8 interns each working 2 to 3 days a week. More than 50% of my staff is made up of past interns, each having persevered their way into full-time positions.  For the right people it’s an opportunity to prove themselves in a place where they can have a direct impact on their own success as well as the team’s. We do not pay our interns, but there are many perks to the position. Our interns show up with smiles on their faces every day!

When I hear the Ontario Government enforcing a loose-y goose law like this one and journalists like McCullough picking a war on a practice that is a personal career choice for each young professional it makes me question their appreciation for freedom of choice and their understanding of the market. When I hear young people rolling their eyes at the practice it just comes across as complain-y and entitled. And typically in my career path I’ve been fortunate to learn that complaining, making your problems about the system, and avoiding the basic act of putting your head down and working hard will ensure you’re the only one left frustrated. I’m a big believer in the idea of natural selection in terms of hard work. The world is made up of natural selection. You can say that the opportunity wasn’t fair (and you’re right) and you can say that everyone should be equal (but they’re not) but none of that matters. If you can work hard, and I mean really truly hard, you can overcome any set backs and make a difference. You can be successful. And isn’t that what we all want at the end of the day? By whatever standards we choose to define success, that is.

What I do love about the music industry though – and I know everyone wants to whine that it’s corrupt (more complaining) – is that there is a great sense of natural selection. Those who work hard, write great songs, and have a great strategy usually rise to the top. They are usually rewarded for their talents while the complainers sit back in their basements making their issues about everyone else except themselves. Time and time again the people who put their heads down and stay focused all of the sudden find themselves towering over the rest. Sure there are flukes and exceptions but I have no time to worry about those.

Reporter Andrew Coyne at The National Post, who has been considered an “apologist” by McCullough, raises some great points in his article “Government Crackdown on Unpaid Internships Hurts Interns the Most“. He states, “The [internship] programs are always oversubscribed, to the tune of 10 applications for every one accepted. The government claims to have been acting “on a complaint,” but it sure didn’t come from the interns. Rather, it appears to have come from somewhere in the NDP-union-activist complex, and with an election coming… No one puts a gun to the head of the people (interns).”

I agree with Andrew’s viewpoint here 100%. With laws like this we are going to lead ourselves to an even bigger problem – young “professionals” who actually don’t know how to work hard and prove their value in an increasingly competitive market. If you find a company you like and you can see yourself building a career there, then it’s up to you and only you to rise above any obstacles and make yourself an indispensable part of their team. The interns or volunteers who can do this probably won’t be interns for long. I’m not saying that becoming successful requires working for free or being ‘taken advantage of’. I am saying it takes a lot of hard work, and as a young person given the opportunity to prove yourself, don’t get hung up on semantics and work hard.

Learn to work the system to your benefit, or instead of strategizing your way into a successful position you can sit around and complain about unpaid internships. Meanwhile success is passing you by.

If you ask me, the only consistent and honest thing you can really believe in is hard work. I made this decision at a very young age. I mean HOURS of head down – weekends, late nights at your desk, writing, executing, calling, fighting for what you believe in, and strategizing. To clarify – this is what I mean when I say ‘hard work’. If you love what you do and feel good doing it money should be far from mind.

If you want to find ways to get out of working hard – whether it’s complaining about interning, inflicting laws or opinions to influence the youth of today and their internships, or any other distractions you deem worthy in your life – no one is going to stop you. But rest assured no one is going to look back to help you when you are left feeling frustrated and undervalued in your career and life.

Or perhaps – if you’re one of these people who feel entitled to a great job but don’t feel like doing much of the work needed to get there – may I suggest a relocation to France. They have inflicted a ban on work related web browsing and emails after 6pm. You can soiree while the rest of the world gets ahead and makes important decisions when they’re needing to be made.

Do yourself a favour and start to do whatever it takes. Prove your value and the rest will fall in to place. Hard work speaks louder than any of this.

Call me an ‘apologist’, sure, as long as it’s second to ‘successful’.

Sari Delmar is the Founder and CEO of Audio Blood, Canada’s leading creative artist and brand marketing company. Through unique PR and promotional packages, Audio Blood continues to be on the cutting edge of music marketing and promotion. Their client roster includes the likes of Pistonhead Lager, PledgeMusic, Iceland Airwaves, Canadian Music Week, Riot Fest, Beau’s All Natural Brewing, The Balconies, Ben Caplan, and more. At the age of 24, Sari leads a team of 10 out of the company HQ in Toronto, Ontario, has spoken at a number of music conferences and colleges, and sits on the Toronto Music Advisory Council. Read more from Sari at SariDelmar.com

You’ve booked your tour, you’ve practiced your songs, you’ve packed the van, but you’re feeling like something’s missing. How can you get more people to come out to your shows? With gross ticket revenue up nearly 30% worldwide and touring having eclipsed record sales as the main source of artist income, Bandsintown’s Artist Platform has become an indispensable promotional tool for alerting fans when you’re on tour.

Over 10 million concert-goers use Bandsintown to discover shows, buy tickets and share tour dates with their friends. It automatically generates alerts for your fans through email, mobile notifications and Facebook notifications, and if you use Auto Promote or Twitter Sync, Bandsintown delivers alerts to your fans there too. Today Bandsintown powers the tour dates for over 215,000 touring artists, ensuring their fans never miss another live show.

Bandsintown provides a wide range of tools that artists can utilize to engage with existing fans and reach new concert-goers, so it’s understandable you may not know all of the ins and outs of the platform. This post highlights four things you can do right now – for free – to get the most out of Bandsintown for your band.

1. Add Tour Dates To Bandsintown

There’s no reason your tour information shouldn’t reach as many fans as possible, and through Bandsintown, your fans will find and share it. As soon as your tour dates are confirmed, add them to Bandsintown. You can easily do this by adding the Bandsintown Artist Platform app on Facebook and adding all of your tour dates using the unique template Bandsintown offers.

2. Sync Your Shows Across The Web

Bandsintown will sync all of your tour dates across the web – on Google Search or YouTube for instance. Be sure to add the Bandsintown widget to your website or blog to automatically index your tour dates across the web. Adding Bandsintown links to your YouTube videos and descriptions can’t hurt either.

3. Tell Your Fans To Track You On Bandsintown

With the number of concert-goers using Bandsintown rapidly increasing by the day, there’s no argument that a great deal of your current fans are already using the app. However, many of them may not have Tracked you on Bandsintown.

Building Trackers is a great way to connect with ALL of your fans, not just a certain percentage. Think of Trackers like an extension of your mailing list. Every time you have a new a show in their area, your Trackers will be notified. It’s important you let fans know how to never miss your shows!

Invite your fans to Track you by posting Bandsintown Track links to all of your social networks. Want to know how many Trackers you have already? Justvisit: www.bandsintown.com/yourartistname

4. Share With Your Fans

Your fans want to hear from you all the time, and Bandsintown is there to help. Your artist profile enables you to connect with fans by sharing tour info – and live videos and photos from your tour. Not only is this a rad addition for everyone out there who loves your music and live shows, but it will help drive RSVPs and ticket sales for upcoming shows. And having more money in your pocket is always a GOOD thing!

Happy bands, happy fans. That’s what Bandsintown is all about. Questions? Send them to us at biz@bandsintown.com.

Getting your band noticed can seem like a daunting if not impossible task. Promoting your art and getting publicity are things you know you should be doing but it can be hard to know where to start. Fortunately, we’ve broken it down for you into four distinct sections: Image, Radio, Publicists and the One Sheet. So let’s dive in!


Part I: Image

If you want to have an impact on your audience you must take the time to think about your image and accompanying artwork. You will surely find examples where image didn’t matter in someone’s career but, generally speaking, image is very important. Your music and image are often intertwined and send a message about who you are. Regardless of the genre of your music, your image should be an honest and accurate reflection of who you are. Your music should suit your image and not leave people confused and guessing what kind of music you perform. Here’s an extreme example to help you get the point: if you’re in a modern rock band, it isn’t a good idea for the band to be photographed wearing cowboy hats and sitting on hay bales…and yes, we have seen this! If you are not comfortable looking a certain way, don’t do it. When it comes time to hire a photographer you will probably also need to hire a wardrobe stylist who will make you look your best and help you look like a cohesive unit if you are a band. Similarly, your artwork can have an impact on shaping your career. Here are some classic album cover images that will instantly appear in your head: “Nevermind” by Nirvana, “Abbey Road” by The Beatles, “London Calling” by The Clash. People often do judge an album by its cover. Your cover can have a lasting impact, as should your music.

Part II: Radio

Is the song great? Is it as good or better than anything being played right now? Be honest with yourself. You may think some artist’s suck but if they’re getting widespread radio play, then they’re doing something right. It doesn’t mean it is better than yours but it means it fits those specific radio station’s formats.

Do you have a story to tell? Are you selling out shows? Is your song on a tv commercial or movie? Is there any press? Are people in your area familiar with you? Are people who don’t know you calling the local radio station on their own asking them to play your music? Do radio stations even know you exist? How are your YouTube views? Are your social numbers big? Are people engaging with you online? Are bloggers talking about you? Are other artists talking about you? Is your song available for purchase on the dsp’s and is it selling? Are there labels and publishers involved with your project? If not, why not?

These are the types of questions that radio programmers will ask before even considering playing your music. Be sure to include them in your pitch.

You must be prepared. Radio play is only one component of a bigger, balanced plan. Depending on your style of music, you may be the type of Artist that never gets (or wants) widespread commercial airplay. If that’s the case, you will still want to look at local station’s indie hours (if they have one), non-commercial radio, campus radio, specialty shows, internet radio, and more. They are all examples of ways to eventually get on radio playlists but ALL the above questions still stand.

Part III: Publicists

Are you ready for a Publicist? Well, a Publicist can be an important part of your team or a colossal waste of your money, this depends on you. Generally speaking, you need to have a good reason to hire a Publicist. It typically circles around a new release. If you have new music coming get your tools together: artwork, bio, photos, videos, and more. Think about a lead time of at least three months for your Publicist to set up your campaign and attempt to confirm long-lead press. Even all of this is not enough to garner much attention; you need a story. If you’ve played a bunch of shows and have built up a decent following you need to have your Publicist talk about it. Have you played with other more well know bands? If so, you need to drop their names. Do your lyrics come from a dark place due to something that happened in your life? If so, you may need to tell the story. Think of what people will find interesting about you and your artistry. With a Publicist, you typically pay for a specific time period and there are no guarantees that you will get any press. Shop around. Speak to as many Publicists as you can. See if there’s a natural fit. Do they specialize in your type of music? Which other artists do they represent? Have they had good placements for their clients? Talk to those artists if you can. You will want personal service and the best advocate for your brand. Be ready, choose wisely, and don’t waste your money.

Part IV: The One Sheet

What do you need to accompany your music? First of all, we at Coalition Music feel there’s no need to print anything or manufacture something elaborate. Save your money and use it for something else. We usually like to see a PDF one-sheet (or sometimes called a hype sheet) that contains a short bio, photo, links to videos, relevant press (we don’t care who you’ve shared the stage with at a multi act festival), list of past/future tour dates, links to your socials, links to music, etc. Basically, we want to be able to get to know you without sifting and searching for and through tons of material. Tell us what’s really going on with your project but don’t hype us with bullshit. Do you have a story to tell? A one-sheet should literally be one sheet.


Coalition Music, a full service global music management, record company and artist incubator, has been helping musicians facilitate their own success for over 23 years, cultivating an internationally renowned artist roster that includes Our Lady Peace, Simple Plan, USS and Finger Eleven. Besides representing an exceptional breadth of successful Canadian talent, running a record label and overseeing a world-class recording studio and rehearsal space, Coalition Music also runs an incubator/education facility which offers a variety of professional development and education programs that incorporate unique networking, collaborating and mentorship opportunities.  such as Artist Entrepreneur, the Coalition Music Tour and Tech Academy, and “The Music Business”, a registered high school credit course which is run by Coalition Music’s charitable arm, TEMPO (Through Education Music Provides Opportunity). The high school course complements traditional high school music education with business and entrepreneurial skills, and is offered at Wexford Collegiate School for the Arts, and through the Toronto Catholic School Board’s Continuing Education Department, in both night and summer school programming. The course is also offered at Wasse Abin High School of the Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve on Manitoulin Island, and will be expanded into Nbisiing Secondary School on the Nipissing First Nation Reserve in 2014. Coalition Music’s cross-functional business and facility have been recognized throughout the music industry and beyond, and were recently featured as a case study for music education development in Music Canada’s recent publication on the state of the Canadian music industry, The Next Big Bang.

The music recording process can prove daunting for amateur artists and established brands alike. It has been observed that recording sessions can take up a lot of time, music albums can often go over budget. Besides this, artistic and musical differences can put a real strain on music band’s relationships.

If you are taking up Montreal guitar lessons or West Land Music Lessons, make sure that you are giving your best every time you attend sessions for it. After having gaining experience, you can then move ahead for music recording.

In order to ensure you get a good music recording it is very important to select the best recording studio. This will help you achieve your goals in your musical career. With a good quality music recording, you can take your music career to that successful next level, enhance your professional appeal and show that you are serious about your work.

Below are some of the noteworthy tips that prove helpful for artists at the time of music recording:

  1. Get your gear into shape – Before reaching the studio, it is very important to ensure that your guitar or musical instrument is in good working order. If you feel that your guitar strings or drum heads need to be changed, then get it done. Swap out the batteries as well, if required. It is advisable to get your guitars or electric basses checked out by a technical expert if your guitar requires any adjustment.
  2. Preparation – It is a good idea to put together a rough live demo of the material that you are planning to record. This will help you ascertain the best and worst part of your music.
  3. Start recording – Ensure that everyone is in sync. Put your total focus and effort into what your music is all about.
  4. Review the session – It is advised to make rough demos for every session’s progress. After this, you should review it quietly on your own time and at different levels and machines like cars or iPods. Also, it is very important to not rely on the loud level from studio to critique your recording.
  5. Budget limit – Determine your budget. Working with some recording studios can be an expensive affair. By taking some time off, you’re sure to find a good price to quality ratio. There is no need to spend a fortune on music recording, especially if you are just starting your music career. Also, check out all the recording equipment of the studio, to ensure that you have approached the right studio.

With the tips above, you can be sure that your music recording will be great.

Author Bio: Phil Cavalier is a trained sound engineer with years of experience in one of the famous recording studios. He is currently the owner and manager of the leading recording studio in North London. Besides this, he also regularly gives Montreal guitar lessons or West Land Music Lessons.

Now, if you’re an artist or start-up business owner, you most likely know how it feels to go without, for the sake of your career, simply because you have that much passion for it. You may even be going through that phase right now, and you may feel like you’re stuck between a rock and a hard place when it comes to your career. Does this cycle sound familiar to you:

  • I don’t have money because my music/business hasn’t taken off.
  • My music/business hasn’t taken off because it’s not being promoted enough.
  • It’s not being promoted enough because promotion takes money, and I don’t have money.
  • (repeat steps 1-3 above)

This is probably one of the most frustrating phases that about every career builder has gone through. The good news about this cycle, is that promotiondoesn’t have to cost loads of money. Ironically enough, the cheapest/free forms of promotion work the best!

Now, as you know, different marketing tactics yield different results for each business, depending on the nature of the business, the execution of that marketing tactic, your target market (I will discuss what a target market is in a future post so be sure to follow us!), etc, but there are certain ground rules to marketing that go pretty much across the board. Here are a few to get you started:

  • Free Samples: I briefly talked about the wonders of free samples in a previous marketing post about “Being Your Own Case Study”. Free samples almost always work for a few reasons. For one, the obvious, the customer doesn’t have to spend money to experience your brand, so having nothing to lose will levitate them toward what you are trying to sell. Secondly, free samples allow people to freely develop a personal relationship with your brand, and that’s important because barely anyone actually buys into something they’re not familiar with, no matter how well the brand is presented to them, which brings me to the third reason: Sometimes, people never realize they actually “need” or “want” something until they try it, and if what you’re trying to market actually fulfills a need or a desire that’s not being fulfilled by anyone else, you’re already in good business. For example, I never used facial exfoliators before, but the cashier presented me with a free sample of Garnier Balanced Daily Exfoliator. I went home and tried it, and my face was super soft, and I ended up going back and buying a whole bottle of it. I never realized that I “needed” that exfoliator until I tried the free sample…. (Cont’d)